White people will believe anything if they think it’s a Native American proverb.
Native American Proverb (via presidentobarna)
anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California | Huffington Post
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California | Huffington Post

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

descentintotyranny:

On capitalism and coercion | Al Jazeera
Are trafficking, slavery and forced labour actually necessary for maintaining liberal capitalism?
Apr. 18 2014
Slavery, trafficking and forced labour are crimes which sit at the far end of the labour exploitation spectrum. As Bridget Anderson observes, they are to “badness” what apple pie and motherhood are to “goodness” - that is, just as we all know that apple pie and motherhood are “good”, so everybody knows that these three are “bad”.
And by any measure, they’re getting worse. Barely a day passes without stories of trafficked women here or child slaves there. Governments all over are passing laws, NGO interest is exploding, films such as 12 Years A Slave are mobilising the media, and more people are either being exploited or are in sufficient precarity to be attuned to that exploitation.
Yet there are major problems with this trend. Although exploitation merits our attention, the contemporary focus on its extreme forms obscures far more than it reveals. By concentrating on extremes which are considered to lie outside of the liberal capitalist system, we are in fact led away from a discussion as to how liberal capitalism is itself responsible for these extremes, and for the wider exploitation and dispossession of which they are but the worst manifestations.
In what follows, I wish to make the case, therefore, not only that we must be more critical when thinking of trafficking, slavery and forced labour; but that, conceptually and politically, we would do well to understand these apparently “outside-of-the-system” extremes as systemically necessary to the maintenance of liberal capitalism itself.
(Read Full Text)

descentintotyranny:

On capitalism and coercion | Al Jazeera

Are trafficking, slavery and forced labour actually necessary for maintaining liberal capitalism?

Apr. 18 2014

Slavery, trafficking and forced labour are crimes which sit at the far end of the labour exploitation spectrum. As Bridget Anderson observes, they are to “badness” what apple pie and motherhood are to “goodness” - that is, just as we all know that apple pie and motherhood are “good”, so everybody knows that these three are “bad”.

And by any measure, they’re getting worse. Barely a day passes without stories of trafficked women here or child slaves there. Governments all over are passing laws, NGO interest is exploding, films such as 12 Years A Slave are mobilising the media, and more people are either being exploited or are in sufficient precarity to be attuned to that exploitation.

Yet there are major problems with this trend. Although exploitation merits our attention, the contemporary focus on its extreme forms obscures far more than it reveals. By concentrating on extremes which are considered to lie outside of the liberal capitalist system, we are in fact led away from a discussion as to how liberal capitalism is itself responsible for these extremes, and for the wider exploitation and dispossession of which they are but the worst manifestations.

In what follows, I wish to make the case, therefore, not only that we must be more critical when thinking of trafficking, slavery and forced labour; but that, conceptually and politically, we would do well to understand these apparently “outside-of-the-system” extremes as systemically necessary to the maintenance of liberal capitalism itself.

(Read Full Text)

"Decolonization in my heart and my machete." 

— Oakland Street Art

"Decolonization in my heart and my machete."

— Oakland Street Art

formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Quanah Parker, the last Chief of the Quahada Comanche tribe.
Quanah was the son of Peta Nocona an Cynthia Ann Parker, a white captive of the Comanches who remained with the Indians for almost twenty-five years and became thoroughly Comanche. It is said that in the mid-1840s her brother, John Parker, who had been captured with her in the 1836 raid at Fort Parker on the headwaters of the Navasota River in what is now Limestone County and was later released, asked her to return to their family, but she refused, explaining that she loved her husband and children too much to leave them.  
During the 1860s the Quahadas (“Antelopes”) were known as the most warlike of the various Comanche bands. Among them Quanah became an accomplished horseman and gradually proved himself to be an able leader. These qualities were increasingly in demand when, as a consequence of their refusal to attend the Medicine Lodge Treaty Council or to move to a reservation as provided by the treaty, the Quahadas became fugitives on the Staked Plains. There, beyond the effective range of the military, they continued to hunt buffalo in the traditional way while raiding settlements.
For the next seven years Parker’s Quahadas held the Texas plains virtually uncontested. In October, 1871 a raid led by Parker and his Commanche where they stole 70 horses from the army at Rock Station resulted in Commanding Officer Colonel Ranald Mackenzie chasing them. Attempts by the Forth Cavalry led by Mackenzie to track and subdue the Indians in 1871 and 1872 failed. Not only was the army unable to find the Indians but, at Blanco Canyon on the morning of October 9, 1871, the troopers lost many horses when Quanah and his followers raided the cavalry campsite. Afterward, the Indians seemingly disappeared onto the plains, only to reappear and attack again. Mackenzie gave up the search in mid-1872.

formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Quanah Parker, the last Chief of the Quahada Comanche tribe.

Quanah was the son of Peta Nocona an Cynthia Ann Parker, a white captive of the Comanches who remained with the Indians for almost twenty-five years and became thoroughly Comanche. It is said that in the mid-1840s her brother, John Parker, who had been captured with her in the 1836 raid at Fort Parker on the headwaters of the Navasota River in what is now Limestone County and was later released, asked her to return to their family, but she refused, explaining that she loved her husband and children too much to leave them.  

During the 1860s the Quahadas (“Antelopes”) were known as the most warlike of the various Comanche bands. Among them Quanah became an accomplished horseman and gradually proved himself to be an able leader. These qualities were increasingly in demand when, as a consequence of their refusal to attend the Medicine Lodge Treaty Council or to move to a reservation as provided by the treaty, the Quahadas became fugitives on the Staked Plains. There, beyond the effective range of the military, they continued to hunt buffalo in the traditional way while raiding settlements.

For the next seven years Parker’s Quahadas held the Texas plains virtually uncontested. In October, 1871 a raid led by Parker and his Commanche where they stole 70 horses from the army at Rock Station resulted in Commanding Officer Colonel Ranald Mackenzie chasing them. Attempts by the Forth Cavalry led by Mackenzie to track and subdue the Indians in 1871 and 1872 failed. Not only was the army unable to find the Indians but, at Blanco Canyon on the morning of October 9, 1871, the troopers lost many horses when Quanah and his followers raided the cavalry campsite. Afterward, the Indians seemingly disappeared onto the plains, only to reappear and attack again. Mackenzie gave up the search in mid-1872.

Top 5 Secrets of the Private Prison Industry | Yahoo

sinidentidades:

There are 2.3 million prisoners behind bars in the United States, costing the federal government about $55 billion a year. Ten percent of all prisons in the U.S. are privately operated. The Daily Ticker embarked on an investigation to take you behind the scenes of this unique and secretive industry.

In 1984 the Corrections Corporation of America (CXW) revolutionized the way prisons in the United States operate. The company took over a prison facility in Hamilton County, Tennessee — the first time a private operator was contracted to run a jail. More prison companies were created and contracts continued to flow — between 1990 and 2010 the number of privately operated prisons in the U.S. increased 1600%. The increase in privately operated prisons has outpaced both the growth of public prison facilities and even the U.S. population.

Private prisons bring in about $3 billion in revenue annually, and over half of that comes from holding facilities for undocumented immigrants. Private operations run between 50% to 55% of immigrant detainment facilities. The immigration bill battling its way through Washington right now might also mean good things for private prisons. Some estimate that the crackdown on undocumented immigrants will lead to 14,000 more inmates annually with 80% of that business going to private prisons.

The prison industry has also made money by contracting prison labor to private companies. The companies that have benefited from this cheap labor include Starbucks (SBUX), Boeing (BA), Victoria’s Secret, McDonalds (MCD) and even the U.S. military. Prison laborers cost between 93 cents and $4 a day and don’t need to collect benefits, thus making them cheap employees.

Federal Prison Industries, a company that contracts out prison labor, made over $900 million in revenue last year. FPI has prisoners working in apparel, clean energy, printing, document conversion and call centers. While FPI claims that prisoners are gaining real-world skills and learning trades, some argue otherwise.

“This is a threat to not just established industries; it’s a threat to emerging industries,” says Representative Bill Huizenga (R-Mich).

While CCA and the GEO Group claim that private prisons bolster competition and efficiency in the prison system, Christopher Petrella, a prison policy analyst and author, argues that it’s the opposite.

“What’s fascinating is that two companies alone constitute 75% of the entire ‘private prisons market’ and so often the two companies will make claims that competition ends up bringing efficiency and efficacy into the marketplace and their services but unfortunately is creating a duopoly,” he says.

Corrections Corporation of America and The GEO Group made $1.7 and $1.6 billion in annual revenue last year. CCA operates 67 federal and local facilities and has about 40% market share while the GEO Group operates 95 prisons in the U.S. and abroad.

These companies are not classified as correctional facilitators; they consider themselves real estate investment trusts, or REITs, to limit corporate tax liability. Corrections Corporation of America and The GEO Group derive about 40% of their revenue from the federal government — and are exempt from paying federal taxes.

Fuck Capitalism

simply-sentimental:

yeah fuck capitalism but we’re all a part of this system yo. each of us contributes to it.

Duh. But let’s not pretend some, say the Koch brothers, are not vastly more culpable than others. Socializing guilt and responsibility is destructive to efforts of undermining, subverting, and abolishing status quo power dynamics. I call it shotgun syndrome, that is failing to accurately access who is exploitive and whom, to what degree, are exploited.

america-wakiewakie:

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism 

Award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author, Naomi Klein, talks about her latest book, “The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism”.

From naomiklein.org: 

In THE SHOCK DOCTRINE, Naomi Klein explodes the myth that the global free market triumphed democratically. Exposing the thinking, the money trail and the puppet strings behind the world-changing crises and wars of the last four decades, The Shock Doctrine is the gripping story of how America’s “free market” policies have come to dominate the world— through the exploitation of disaster-shocked people and countries. 

At the most chaotic juncture in Iraq’s civil war, a new law is unveiled that would allow Shell and BP to claim the country’s vast oil reserves…. Immediately following September 11, the Bush Administration quietly out-sources the running of the “War on Terror” to Halliburton and Blackwater…. After a tsunami wipes out the coasts of Southeast Asia, the pristine beaches are auctioned off to tourist resorts…. New Orleans’s residents, scattered from Hurricane Katrina, discover that their public housing, hospitals and schools will never be reopened…. These events are examples of “the shock doctrine”: using the public’s disorientation following massive collective shocks – wars, terrorist attacks, or natural disasters — to achieve control by imposing economic shock therapy. Sometimes, when the first two shocks don’t succeed in wiping out resistance, a third shock is employed: the electrode in the prison cell or the Taser gun on the streets. 

Based on breakthrough historical research and four years of on-the-ground reporting in disaster zones, The Shock Doctrine vividly shows how disaster capitalism – the rapid-fire corporate reengineering of societies still reeling from shock – did not begin with September 11, 2001. The book traces its origins back fifty years, to the University of Chicago under Milton Friedman, which produced many of the leading neo-conservative and neo-liberal thinkers whose influence is still profound in Washington today. New, surprising connections are drawn between economic policy, “shock and awe” warfare and covert CIA-funded experiments in electroshock and sensory deprivation in the 1950s, research that helped write the torture manuals used today in Guantanamo Bay. 

The Shock Doctrine follows the application of these ideas through our contemporary history, showing in riveting detail how well-known events of the recent past have been deliberate, active theatres for the shock doctrine, among them: Pinochet’s coup in Chile in 1973, the Falklands War in 1982, the Tiananmen Square Massacre in 1989, the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Asian Financial crisis in 1997 and Hurricane Mitch in 1998. 

thanoblesavage:

Malcolm was a prophet.

thanoblesavage:

Malcolm was a prophet.

"Here are fifty white guys. Here are fifty black guys. Here’s how many white guys can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. The chances amount to one in seventeen. Now here’s how many black guys can expect the same thing. The chances are one out of three. Why? Lots of reasons. It’s complicated, but one thing is clear: There’s racial bias at every level of the criminal justice system."

— What are your chances of going to prison? | Brave New Films 

(Photo Credit: Matt Bors)
Hi i have a question, can u tell me the site where you got the Times Magazine covers from? Thanks! — Asked by Anonymous

Daily Kos. Sources are almost always embedded within the title of an article. 

america-wakiewakie:

hiroshimalated:

Everyone pretends to be down with the cause until you need something.

It’s crazy. A while back I circulated a post to raise money for a friend of a friend in a tough situation, and of the tens of thousands of people who had to have seen that call to arms (because assisting comrades meet their material needs is a fucking call to arms if there ever was one) only like two or three in the blogosphere helped out.

Now I get that most of us don’t really know each other, but damn I never knew we had to be tight to know this struggle is something we share, so we best start learning to share the burden of it together. But even this idea of collective security applied to our material shortcomings has an inherent pitfall, that is we must be vigilant not to become the first aid kit to the wounds capitalism inflicts upon us. If such comes to pass we act to further enable our oppressor by creating amongst ourselves the safety net which allows it to remain substantively unchallenged.

Simultaneously, we have to build our own systems that keep us from falling into the chasm of poverty, but also let those transform into the foundations for new modes of living that directly displace capitalist power, thereby empowering ourselves.